Should Eating While Driving Be Legal

Should Eating While Driving Be Legal?

Should Eating While Driving Be Legal? The Dangers of Distracted Driving. Today’s guest blog is by the Churdar Law Firm. The opinions expressed by the author in this and all guest blogs are not necessarily those of Marc J. Victor, P.C.

GREENVILLE, South Carolina. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that distracted driving kills approximately 3,477 people every year, injuring another 391,000. We often hear about the dangers of distracted driving as it is related to texting and driving—and for a good reason: texting and driving are increasingly becoming a factor in many car accidents. As a result of this new danger, states have implemented laws to regulate cell phone use behind the wheel. In many states, you can be fined or ticketed for texting and driving.

Should Eating While Driving Be Legal? The Dangers of Distracted Driving

However, there are many other forms of distracted driving. Some people may not be aware that eating and driving is also a form of distracted driving. Recent studies indicate that eating and driving can be just as dangerous as texting and driving. Yet, despite this, there are no laws governing eating and driving behind the wheel. Should eating and driving be legal, or should there be laws regulating the practice?

Should Eating While Driving Be Legal? The Dangers of Distracted Driving

Should Eating While Driving Be Legal? The Dangers of Distracted Driving

Like texting and driving, eating and driving can sometimes result in injuries and deaths. A recent lawsuit against a Metro Bus driver in Cincinnati alleges that the driver was distracted due to eating and driving before hitting a pedestrian. USA Today reports that the driver was throwing away a chili cup when the accident occurred. Reports indicate that the bus driver did not stop after hitting the pedestrian. The driver was found guilty of vehicular homicide, and the family is pursuing a lawsuit against the driver.

Despite the fact that eating and driving is dangerous, it remains technically legal to consume food and beverages while operating a motor vehicle. This doesn’t mean that officers don’t pull over drivers for engaging in the practice. According to Thrillist, one New Jersey police officer spoke about times where he pulled over drivers thinking they were intoxicated only to learn that they had been eating behind the wheel, or had just spilled a coffee. Officers saw drivers swerve onto oncoming lanes, weave between lanes, and otherwise drive erratically.

An estimated 80% of car accidents are the result of distracted driving. While there is no specific legislation banning eating and driving behind the wheel, if you engage in the practice and get into an accident, you could be held responsible under the law. Reckless driving laws may be applicable to eating and driving accidents in which people are injured or killed. And, individuals who harm others while eating and driving can also be sued for their negligence or neglect behind the wheel.

Should Eating While Driving Be Legal? The Dangers of Distracted Driving

The Churdar Law Firm are car accident lawyers in Greenville, South Carolina who see the ill effects of distracted driving. Victims of distracted driving might face high medical costs, lost wages due to missed time at work, and experience pain and suffering. If you or a loved one has been hurt due to another driver’s choice to eat behind the wheel, you may have important rights under the law. The Churdar Law Firm may be able to help you seek compensation for your losses and justice for your car crash.

Citations:

https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/distracted-driving

https://www.thrillist.com/eat/nation/distracted-driving-eating

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/01/31/lawsuit-bus-driver-eating-chili-before-fatal-crash/1084958001 

https://www.churdarlaw.com/car-accident-law

Should Eating While Driving Be Legal? The Dangers of Distracted Driving